Upcoming Appearences

Norwescon 37 is nearly upon us in beautiful Seattle, which means it’s time to share my schedule. You can find me at the con April 17–20th!

Faith in Speculative Fiction
Fri 2:00pm-3:00pm Cascade 10
Faith is an area that is often overlooked in world-building and character motivation for speculative fiction in spite of the impact that it has had and continues to have (for good and bad) in our world. How does faith affect the setting and formation of a fictional world? How has faith been used well (or badly) in our genres?
Lillian Cohen-Moore (M), Stina Leicht, Ken Scholes, Dean Wells, G. Willow Wilson

Tech at the Gaming Table
Sat 2:00pm-3:00pm Cascade 12
Do you involve technology into your tabletop game nights? What works and what is just a big distraction? This will cover tools to involve people further into your stories, and how to avoid the pitfalls of modern day attention getters driving distraction from the game. We will also talk about how to use Skype and other video conferencing to involve players from far away.
Lillian Cohen-Moore (M), Eric Cagle, Bruce R Cordell, Amber Eagar, Dylan S.

Invisible Disabilities
Sat 10:00am-11:00am Cascade 3&4
Not every disability is apparent at a glance, nor is anyone’s personal health anyone else’s business. From mental illness to chronic disease to a variety of syndromes and impairments too lengthy to list, we’ll discuss the difficulties of living with chronic health conditions, the stigmas associated, what progress has (or hasn’t) been made in reforming public perception, and strategies on getting other people to mind their own blasted business.
Maida ‘Mac’ Combs (M), Lillian Cohen-Moore, Sar Surmick, Lilith von Fraumench

Women in Games
Sat 4:00pm-5:00pm Cascade 7&8
Our annual discussion of women in both the games industry and gaming as a hobby.
Julie Haehn (M), Lillian Cohen-Moore, Angel Leigh McCoy, Lola Watson, Gwen Yeh

Seanan McGuire Q&A
Sat 5:00pm-6:00pm Evergreen 3&4
A Q&A session with Norwescon 37 Special Guest of Honor Seanan McGuire.
Lillian Cohen-Moore, Seanan McGuire

 

In other upcoming con-related news, I’ll be Indianapolis this August 14-17, for Gen Con, as an Industry Insider Guest of Honor. This year’s slate of Insiders is amazing, and I’m so happy to get to be a part of it.

Storiums, All The Way Down

If I think back, I’m pretty sure the first time I heard of Storium was a passing tweet in Will Hindmarch’s timeline. The word caught my eye. It got a mental post-it note stuck to it, and I kept my eye out. When Storium first went into playtesting, I didn’t have time to check it out. I wouldn’t actually have a playtesting account till last November, and I wouldn’t actually start playing or narrating games till February.

Why play Storium, when I’ve already done play by post for years? When I already have years of live-action roleplaying and tabletop experience?

Because it clicked for me.

Storium is about a story, one you’re telling as a group with friends. When I attempt something but don’t succeed in perfect, boring colours, my friends bite their nails while finding out what happens next. In so many games I’ve played in my life, failure was a dead-end. Storium has novel DNA in it, and dead-ends can be opportunities, either for growth, or unexpected developments.

Play-by-post games, in my case, are usually a recipe for burn out. My PbP experiences have largely been mirrors of the more unpleasant experiences I’ve had with toxic tabletop groups. That Storium wasn’t a message board was a huge sell for me. I don’t have to roll dice, have someone roll dice for me, or use some retrofitted-to-online math to find out what happens at the end of a swordfight, a rockfall, translating the ancient book. The system for creating and resolving challenging situations is baked into the site, and everyone gets to see the plays other people make. We’re all using the same tools, tools specifically designed for this purpose. I’ve been gaming for over 20 years, and the challenge/resolve system Storium uses is one of the more fascinating ones I’ve ever seen. And I mean that. I mean that with sincerity, to the point that you can find me saying it on their Kickstarter page.

I started narrating my first Storium game on February 24th, 2014. “But we’ll only shoot for a scene a week,” we said, “because we’re all very busy people.” Honestly, I expected us to lag behind that. We’ve played 15 scenes since the game started.

We’ve only been playing for seven weeks. The chain is as of yet unbroken.

Storium has made people new friends, and put them in touch with old ones. It is a genus loci of a place that doesn’t physically exist in one place. Because Storium exists in many places. And all the Storiums inside, nesting, murmur to each other constantly. People are trading chat names and emails and playlists. The people telling stories are doodling and texting and laughing about what just happened, what might happen next. They’re telling people about the life explosions that kept them from playing that week. Giving each other ideas. Stretching their creative muscles. Telling and playing stories with others, even when they’re afraid they won’t seem as great, shine as much. Storium doesn’t make people more creative: it simply reminds or aids discovery of worlds already inside you.

You get what you put into a game. Storium has a great frame, but it’s a house that’s still asleep, unless players get inside. Then, it’s inhabited.

And once it’s inhabited, it’s alive.

If you want to support Storium adding new worlds, and paying amazing writers to mold them, you can find their Kickstarter page here.

 

Reference Books

Few things will tell you about someone’s work like the reference books they keep close at hand. When I shared my own reference stack on Twitter, I asked for people to send me pictures or lists of their own handy volumes.

AdamusJohn Adamus

Writer/Editor

My primary reference books are, in order of size:

Oxford English Dictionary, Hardcover
Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary 10th Edition, that I’ve had and taken all over the country and world
Writer’s Digest Character Naming sourcebook, 2nd edition
The current Chicago Manual of Style
Turabian, 5th edition, that I’ve heavily written in and marked up and mangled, because it was the first book that turned words into art for me.
Not as reference “look up words” books, but reference-as-encouragement books, I keep:
Rex Stout: A Majesty’s Life (McAleer)
Nero Wolfe of 35th Street (Baring-Gould)

The Annotated Sherlock Holmes (Baring-Gould)

Hammett: A Life At The Edge (Nolan)
The Life of Raymond Chandler (Tom Williams)
because all of those books reminded me that you can write whatever you want, however you want, and be really damn good at something, because you love it the way you love air.
To find John on the web, visit his blog, or find him on Twitter as @awesome_john

 

 

Shannon P. Drake

PR Account Coordinator/Dubious Freelance Writer

Reference Books I Keep Close By:
1. Damnation City by Will Hindmarch et. al.
While this is a book intended for Vampire The Requiem, I’ve never read such a comprehensive guide to creating a fictional city. Since a lot of my work tends to focus on urban areas and be of a darker nature, this is something I consult at least weekly.
2. AP Stylebook
All praise to the Mother Text, without which we would be lost. My agency uses a loose AP style in our releases, so this is obviously the go-to manual.
Okay it’s not technically a book, but if you want a good jumping-off point for a scary story, look at all the weird ways people vanish and die.
4. Fleet to Fleet Encounters by Eric Grove
I think this has since been republished, but is a useful reference for how major fleets encounter each other and wind up fighting. Useful if you’re working on something in that vein, which I naturally am.
5. Over Nine Waves by Marie Heaney
Yet another thing for A Project I am working on.

Shannon can be found tweeting as @PappyShannon

 

 

 

D Dawson
Delilah S. Dawson
Author
What reference books do you keep close by? Thesaurus.com and Wikipedia. And my 1971 New Webster Encyclopedic Dictionary!
Why do you need those books for reference? I found this massive tome in my grandfather’s library when I was 8, and since then, I’ve been dragging it with me everywhere, from college to pregnancy to the studio where I paint and write. In addition to a regular dictionary, it also includes a thesaurus, a Secretary’s Guide, star charts, a 1971-style history of the US, lists of boy and girl names and meanings (which I used to name my kids and characters), famous quotations, and so much more. The last president listed is, of course, Richard Millhouse Nixon. Now my second grade daughter uses it to look up new words when she’s reading The Hobbit.
You can find Delilah on Twitter @DelilahSDawson, or through her website, www.whimsydark.com

 

Caroline Willis

Writer, Computer Science student
Caroline full shelf
 I always have the stack of textbooks for my current semester; besides them I have a small bookshelf in my office. The upper left corner contains my textbooks from previous semesters. The bottom left corner and the overflow are references for Larp Couture; the whole right side are my general writing references.
caroline rogetOne of my favorites is the 1946 printing of Roget’s Thesaurus, and I can honestly not imagine using a modern version. Instead of being organized alphabetically, it’s organized by topic. For example, topic 349 is Wind. It has 31 subtopics, first the synonyms of related nouns, then verbs, then adjectives and last, adverbs. And it has quotes associated with each topic: “He that will use all winds, must shift his sail.” – J. Fletcher. I’ve been a reader for most of my life, but wandering through this old, strange dictionary of ideas was my first real romance with the written word.

Caroline can be found on Twitter @dirtycarrie

 

 

Sexuality and Safety in Monsterhearts

MHCAt the end of 2012, I started a short run as a guest contributor at Bitch Magazine’s blog, examining a number of games and careers that have been produced by the hobby. One of those games I explored in my column was Avery Mcdaldno’s Monsterhearts. In The Sexuality of Monsterhearts, I talked about one of the most integral parts of the game: the sexuality of the characters the players portray.

For those unfamiliar with Monsterhearts: “Monsterhearts lets you and your friends create stories about sexy monsters, teenage angst, personal horror, and secret love triangles. When you play, you explore the terror and confusion that comes both with growing up and feeling like a monster.”

The game was immediately appealing but very fraught for me, and I was incredibly lucky to play the first time with three gifted, kind gamers who made it a very worthwhile experience. I’ve only played Monsterhearts at conventions, and bought my copy at a convention after playing it yet again. It wasn’t until after Big Bad Con in 2012 that I’d end up reading the game in its entirety, and the lack of guidance on treating each other and the subject matter with kindness had really concerned me. But Avery recently completed a short supplement of sorts called Safe Hearts, which will appear in Jackson Tegu’s What Big Teeth You Have.

SHIt’s exactly what I’d said Monsterhearts was missing, and it is absolutely something you can use at the table with other games, and it would take very little customization to do so. Avery outlines the responsibilities Monsterhearts players have to their self, those they play with, and to the characters they portray. Before gaming, groups should set boundaries, to make the space one where people can explore difficult and human topics. Players should breathe, and take breaks to release tension, to reflect and be able to return to the events at hand. [1]

Finally, Avery went over ways players can deal with emotionally recovering from a session of Monsterhearts, with reminders and strategies for being able to call for emotional care during play.

It was the last section, “Reasons to Play,” that spoke to me deeply. That we play to, however second-hand, experience some of the lived experiences of others. We can live, feel and grapple with painful, truthful segments of life when we play a game. That final thought is in a nutshell why I play, write about, and sometimes help make games. Through fiction, we can learn more about the world. Setting up guidelines to honoring  limits doesn’t mean that we will be perfectly safe. Nor does it mean that we won’t explore frightening, uncomfortable, strange emotions.

It means that we are telling each other that we will not abandon one another on our strange journeys.

 

[1] I have a lot of thoughts right now about adapting emotional care to online gaming environments, like games run inside Storium.

The Living Games Conference

Shoshana Kessock is a graduate student at the NYU Game Center, studying Game Design. When she’s not in the classroom, she runs Live Action Role-Playing games, blogs, and regularly deals with zombies at the larp Dystopia Rising. She’s also the coordinator for a first of its kind conference in the United States: the Living Games Conference. Earlier this week, Shoshana answered a few questions about where the inspiration for the conference came from, the work going into it, and why we need it.

LGC flyer

Where did the idea for the Living Games Conference come from? When did you make the decision to coordinate the conference?

The idea for the Living Games Conference was actually inspired by another conference being run at NYU called Different Games, which is a conference about inclusivity and creating spaces for all people in game design and the game community. That conference was being run at NYU to raise awareness about the issue, and I volunteered there during my first year at the Game Center. Shortly thereafter I attended Knutepunkt in Norway in 2013 as well and got a chance to see what Nordic LARP talks and discussions looked like in the heart of a conference all about LARP. That’s when I started to realize that while there were so many conferences to discuss game design and theory in its many forms, we didn’t have a conference for LARP design and theory in North America. I wanted to change that. So in May 2013, at the end of my second semester, I told my department I wanted to run Living Games as my graduate thesis project. And we were off to the races!

How did you assemble the program, academic committees for the conference? What role do they play in how the conference works?

I was lucky enough to have met a lot of really great people while traveling and studying LARP over the last few years, so I had a wonderful group of people to reach out to and bring in for the program committee. Thinkers like Jaakko Stenros, Jessica Hammer, Nick Fortugno, Emily Care Boss, Evan Torner and Sarah Lynne Bowman were all people with whom I was familiar already, so when I reached out I was happy they agreed to help. They came together to help me review all the submissions and decide just who would be speaking and how to help the speakers focus their work to make the best content possible for the conference. Then the academic committee was brought together to review the papers that will be submitted to our proceedings journal that will go with the conference. Along with their usual brilliance in the field, everyone has been fantastic in supporting the work we’re doing here as well.

Who would benefit from attending the conference?

Living Games is a space that can benefit anyone interested in thinking about LARP as a designer, a scholar and a community organizer. Those are the three groups in mind for this conference specifically, but I’d also say that anyone who is even interested in hearing more about the hobby can come and participate. The lectures we’re bringing in are largely academic or design-focused, but LARPers who aren’t any of the above would be able to enjoy the talks and especially enjoy the workshops or game’s showcase.

Why do we need this conference?

This conference is the first of it’s kind in North America – a conference strictly talking about LARP as an innovative, complex and rich part of the game design community. LARP spends a lot of the time being misunderstood and often pushed to the side when it could be contributing some vital ideas to the discussion of games. Other countries have realized this and have places to come together and talk about the future innovations that LARP can create, but here in the US there were only a few scattered pockets. This conference gives people a place to come together and share those ideas with others who are equally passionate about the form. In short: it creates a space for LARPers to speak, discuss and experience new techniques or games.

Will there be recordings from conference talks available after the conference, or live streams during talks?

We are working on getting the conference talks recorded so that they can be made available. In fact, we’re running an IndieGoGo to help fund that portion of the conference that is near to funding. I believe that documentation is so important for us to create that ongoing dialogue about LARPs, so along with an academic proceedings journal to go with the conference, we want to video all we can.


The website for the Living Games Conference is www.livinggamesnyc.com. They can be  found on Twitter @LivingGamesNYC, as and have a Facebook page.  You can buy tickets to the conference on Eventbrite. If you have questions about the event, you can reach the conference by email: livinggamesnyc@gmail.com

The almost completed IndieGoGo for the conference only has a few days left. If you chip in to help with documenting the conference, and you’ll net yourself some neat rewards and the knowledge that you’ve helped fund the first conference of its kind in the United States.  As documentation is completed, IndieGoGo contributors will get links to it as soon as those materials go online.

The Walk

When I was 15 years old, I saw an explosion. I was shoulder to shoulder with my mother in the parking lot of the grocery store, watching a black cloud shooting into the sky.

And then another cloud.

At my feet, I’d dropped the bags I’d been holding. Groceries. Bag of oranges. People stopped, like in the movies, stopped moving, and looked up at the sky turning black. Maybe we were all in shock. Maybe I was just in shock, and everyone was still moving fine. Then all at once, we were moving again, a chorus of voices erupting around us and my mother’s tight voice, the voice she never used, telling me to grab the bags. To get in the car. We started driving, through a city turning dark, a city where a fireball would roll down a nearby creek bed next to a street, incinerating everything in its path.

Power was out everywhere.

We were driving away from the flood of people being evacuated, because we lived outside town, out beyond the miles of broken glass and pitch black clouds. No one knew what it was going on, and we drove past policemen directing traffic, past them, past the sounds of sirens and fear as the fire raged on behind us.

Today, the first episode of a game brought that all back to me, in fresh, startling hues. The heart pounding fear and the need to get far away very, very fast.

* *

It’s an app game, called The Walk. The big view of what The Walk does is simple: it gets you outside, walking, getting exercise. But just walking can be bloody boring, and The Walk fills some of the silence. It sits in your ear, punctuating the silence filled by your breath with voices, pleas, and irresistible action.

The Walk is a thriller. In a case of mistaken identity, a woman takes a seat next to you in Iverness Station. She says things you don’t understand, confusing things about places you’ve never been, and then the world explodes. She guides you out of harms way during the evacuation, passing off a package to you before realizing too late that you are not the courier she was supposed to find.

But you’ll have to do.

You’re walking away—you have to walk because the men looking for you, for her, they’ll see you run—with the only working cell phone in Iverness after the EMP goes off. A woman you have never met before is going to give her life to buy you time to escape, with a package you haven’t opened and don’t understand and are not prepared to carry.

If you stop walking, you’ll die.

If you stop your 500 mile walk, to get the package to Edinburgh, the human race will die.

Enjoy The Walk.

The Walk is available for iOS and Android devices. It was created with the NHS and the UK’s Department of Health, and made by Six to Start and Naomi Alderman.

 

Women in Horror Month

If you’ve ever wanted to learn more about women making horror media, this is your month.  Women in Horror Month is going strong for February; you should take a look at their fun and often knowledge-filled hashtag on Twitter.

Being a single blog post, this is only going to be a drop in the bucket of the fucking amazing work being done by women in the world right now with horror, written or cinematic. But I keep running into folks who haven’t had a chance to dig into the work of women in horror, so consider this a bite-sized intro.

  • To follow some amazing women working with horror as directors, bloggers, writers and journalists, The Horror Honeys has a list to get you started.
  • Last year, SF Signal had a great horror edition of their feature MIND MELD, which you can use a well of horror picks to refill your towering to-read pile. All the books mentioned in that MIND MELD are by women!
  • If someone ever told you black women haven’t written horror, here’s a list of books that proves they’re obviously from an alternate and less awesome timeline than our own.
  • Should someone ever tell you that women don’t write Lovecraftian horror, Silvia Moreno-Garcia has a list that would demonstrate otherwise. Speaking of…
  • Silvia Moreno-Garcia is a great writer, and an equally talented publisher. The Innsmouth Free Press puts out books that go beyond the U.S. borders many of us are familiar with from prominent genre books, bringing in a harvest of horror from places you may have never been. Fiction is one of the gateways we have to a bigger world than our own, and that includes horror. So. Go visit those links and buy every book in sight. You will be better for it. Accept the ensuing nightmares as part of your mental chrysalis to a stranger, creepier, and more well-read being.
  • If you’ve never heard of @GraveyardSis, go find them on Twitter. Horror ceases to be entertaining, or teach us about our world, unless we continually seek out horror that is unfamiliar to us. If you’re not familiar with horror cinema created by women, particularly black women, then following them on Twitter or their blog is going to be time well spent.
  • Like historic flavored oddities? In one book of fiction, you can find an autobiography, a murder mystery, and a trail of tantalizing occult secrets. If you’re into tabletop or live action roleplaying, you can also use it as a slender tome of inspiration. Paula Dempsey’s The Book Of The Smoke won a Gold ENnie in 2012, and it’s not hard to see why once you read it.

 

Leave info and links on your favorite women working with horror. I gotta add to my to-read/to-watch pile, and I’m not waiting till October to get recommendations.

Why You Should Listen: Welcome to Night Vale

Night Vale is a little town out in the desert, that at least claims to be nestled inside our beautiful United States. When you turn your dial to NVCR, you are guided through the day by the voice of Night Vale Community Radio, Cecil Palmer. If you choose to listen to the Welcome to Night Vale podcast in the background, much like I do with NPR, you will eventually suffer repeated mental whiplash, like I did when Cecil informed listeners about the consequences of a PTA meeting.

That whiplash, by the way, is a selling point.

What Is It: A free, twice a month podcast put out by the fantastic souls over at Commonplace Books. But you can donate to keep the dulcet tones of Cecil on the air, thus helping subsidize endless nightmares for the loving listeners of NVCR.

Genre: It’s tagged under “Comedy” on SoundCloud, and if you have what many would call a “twisted” view of comedy’s definition, then yes, it is certainly a comedy. Night Vale is obvious and up front in episodes about the supernatural, occult horror Night Vale residents encounter daily. But Cecil will often make an  impassioned speech about the wonder, joy, brilliance and terrible beauty of human existence. Think of it as hopeful cosmic horror, with a pinch of small town terror. Like a Cozy Mystery after it runs amok in my liquor cabinet and left my house to paint the town red.

Really, really red.

Why Listen, 1A: If you’re here strictly for the chills, you’ll be in the right place. Episodes have great replay value, and if you’re desperate to know what happened without rewinding, there are a number of fan transcripts out on the internet. The podcast has solid scripting, which I’d define as excellent plot execution, consistent world building, and characters that can hold your interest. Episode 19, both A and B parts, scared all conception of calm out of me for the night after I gave them a listen.

Why Listen, 1B: If you’re a creator of art, serial shows, stage work, games, or fiction, Welcome to Night Vale is something to both study and enjoy. Good creative work teaches us more about our own execution of our work, and feeds whatever bizarre monsters that live at the bottom of our subconscious, who in turn whisper sweet, terrible nothings into our ears that eventually become income. For me, the podcast both inspires terror in me as a listener, and appreciative observation of the craft as a creator.

To Learn More: Go to the WELCOME TO NIGHT VALE website, which will also tell you where you can subscribe to the podcast. If you become smitten with the little southwestern town and its unknowable horrors, and want to wear your support, they have merch over at TopatoCo.

Hugo Awards

I have a story eligible for the Hugos this year; you can track down the anthology it appeared in on Amazon.

“Goblin Market” -By Faerie Light anthology – Zombie Sky Press, December 2013.

If you’re not nominating fiction for the Hugos this year, I still recommend that you pick it up. It’s a dark, strange, lovely anthology for fans of the grim folklore surrounding faeries.

I’m not even supposed to be here today

I’ve tried to write about this every which way but fictional. I’ll try for brief.

My entire life, I’ve been sick.  As a little girl, I became so ill that my family withdrew me from school in a last ditch effort to make sure I’d live past third grade. My teens were littered with medical issues. The majority of my 20s has been spent on exam tables or on gurneys. Perpetually surrounded by doctors trying to save my life, all while telling me I was probably going to die in a year or so, so don’t make any fucking plans. I can say from experience that living your life like an extreme of the Dennis Leary dictum about taking Nyquil is a weird way to live.

Doctors have told me not to get married, have children, or expect to survive. I haven’t planned for life past the year I was living in for a long time. But next weekend, after we’ve shaken off the confetti of 2014’s arrival, I’ll turn 30. The age they said I wouldn’t see. Next year, while living the age I didn’t expect to reach, I’ll be getting married.

I still don’t know how long I have, but that’s an uncertainty as familiar to me as my own birth marks and biopsy scars. Next year, embrace fragility, and the great unknowns. Don’t let not always having a plan scare you. And take my mentor’s great advice: don’t waste your heartbeats.

 

 

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